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Researching education: Five further readings on mobile devices in the classroom Researching education: Five further readings on mobile devices in the classroom

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Researching education: Five further readings on mobile devices in the classroom

Welcome to this month’s edition of Researching education: Five further readings. In this series, we take a look at some further readings available on a particular topic, including open access research papers from various online catalogues, and Teacher archive content you might not have come across yet.

Today we’re exploring the topic of mobile devices and particularly their use in the classroom. A range of studies have explored the positives and negatives of integrating the use of mobile phones in the classroom. Here, we’ve gathered some other resources available on the topic of the role of mobile technology in learning.

Five further readings on mobile devices in the classroom

  1. Cunningham Library Catalogue – The Cunningham Library Catalogue is an open access resource filled with Australian education research material. It’s continually being updated and includes journals, government reports and books. Click the link to browse for resources on mobile technologies for learning. These links will continue to be updated as new resources become available.
     
  2. Edresearch Online – EdResearch Online contains hundreds of articles from Australian education journals, some of which are open access. Follow the link to access resources on mobile technologies in education.
     
  3. Mobile learning – why tablets? This research brief focuses on the pedagogical aspects that aid in the improvement of teaching and learning through the use of digital devices, particularly tablets. Questions such as how mobile technologies can support literacy development for children and how mobile technologies can support teachers and their professional development are explored.
     
  4. Review into the non-educational use of mobile devices in NSW schools. In this report, a summary of a review into the risks and benefits that come with the use of mobile devices in New South Wales schools is presented. Multiple recommendations related to the use of technological devices during school hours are offered.
     
  5. Updated review of the global use of mobile technology in education (570KB). This report monitors the adoption of mobile technology globally, particularly in education settings, and the debates surrounding their integration in education. It looks at the implementation of mobile technology in the classroom in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Caribbean and South America.

The Cunningham Library membership is open to individuals, schools and organisations. Membership includes access to a comprehensive collection of education research literature; weekday alerts to a selection of Australian education news; fast supply of articles and books from the collection; support in finding research; and an integrated online search tool that works across all our resources. To become a library member, visit the website.

Readers interested in this topic, may also be interested in investigating ongoing access to DERN. DERN is the Digital Education Research Network, managed by the Australian Council for Educational Research. DERN is for leaders, researchers and educators interested in the use of digital technologies for learning. The specific focuses are about teaching strategies, pedagogy and student achievement using ICT in all sectors of education and across all learning disciplines. A subscription to DERN includes access to the research database, reviews, news and other services.

Welcome to this month’s edition of Researching education: Five further readings. In this series, we take a look at some further readings available on a particular topic, including open access research papers from various online catalogues, and Teacher archive content you might not have come across yet.

Today we’re exploring the topic of mobile devices and particularly their use in the classroom. A range of studies have explored the positives and negatives of integrating the use of mobile phones in the classroom. Here, we’ve gathered some other resources available on the topic of the role of mobile technology in learning.

Five further readings on mobile devices in the classroom

  1. Cunningham Library Catalogue – The Cunningham Library Catalogue is an open access resource filled with Australian education research material. It’s continually being updated and includes journals, government reports and books. Click the link to browse for resources on mobile technologies for learning. These links will continue to be updated as new resources become available.
     
  2. Edresearch Online – EdResearch Online contains hundreds of articles from Australian education journals, some of which are open access. Follow the link to access resources on mobile technologies in education.
     
  3. Mobile learning – why tablets? This research brief focuses on the pedagogical aspects that aid in the improvement of teaching and learning through the use of digital devices, particularly tablets. Questions such as how mobile technologies can support literacy development for children and how mobile technologies can support teachers and their professional development are explored.
     
  4. Review into the non-educational use of mobile devices in NSW schools. In this report, a summary of a review into the risks and benefits that come with the use of mobile devices in New South Wales schools is presented. Multiple recommendations related to the use of technological devices during school hours are offered.
     
  5. Updated review of the global use of mobile technology in education (570KB). This report monitors the adoption of mobile technology globally, particularly in education settings, and the debates surrounding their integration in education. It looks at the implementation of mobile technology in the classroom in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Caribbean and South America.

The Cunningham Library membership is open to individuals, schools and organisations. Membership includes access to a comprehensive collection of education research literature; weekday alerts to a selection of Australian education news; fast supply of articles and books from the collection; support in finding research; and an integrated online search tool that works across all our resources. To become a library member, visit the website.

Readers interested in this topic, may also be interested in investigating ongoing access to DERN. DERN is the Digital Education Research Network, managed by the Australian Council for Educational Research. DERN is for leaders, researchers and educators interested in the use of digital technologies for learning. The specific focuses are about teaching strategies, pedagogy and student achievement using ICT in all sectors of education and across all learning disciplines. A subscription to DERN includes access to the research database, reviews, news and other services.

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