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Room 3: Volume 8

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Room 3: Volume 8

Once a fortnight the Teacher team ventures down to Room 3 – the basement archives at the Australian Council for Educational Research – to bring you education quotes from some of our favourite historical titles.

Room 3 is home to a plethora of texts originating from way back when. Each fortnight we bring you choice titbits from some of our favourite historical titles via Facebook and Twitter.

Long, N. Music in English Education (1959). Faber and Faber: London

‘A separate [music] room is a very desirable feature in a school – as important, as say, the laboratory.’ (1959)

‘It seems to me that the enthusiasm and personality of the music teacher plays a greater part in the teaching of music than in almost any other subject in the school curriculum.’ (1959)

‘Singing, is enjoyable, involves everyone and so leads naturally to the development of love and understanding of music in general.’ (1959)

‘When the head believes in music for its own sake and gives positive support to its pursuit, then usually staff seems to be found, time is made available, and difficulties are overcome; and, more important, music falls into the whole design of the schools work … to play its part in total education.’ (1959)

‘In a well-run school music should indeed play its part in community life.’ (1959)

‘It is often said that the ultimate aim of all aspects of school music is to deepen the appreciation of music through a variety of experiences of it.’ (1959)

‘The various aspects of school music–singing, theory and listening in the classroom, and the various opportunities for performance outside it–ought not to fall into rigid compartments with little overlap between them. For school music should be a unity.’ (1959)

‘Instrumental music is thought by some to provide pupils with a means of emotional “release” and so to contribute to personal growth and stability.’ (1959)

‘Music, which forty years ago was as inaccessible as literature before the invention of printing, is now the unavoidable daily experience of all.’ (1959)

‘Today music is the accompaniment to everyday life, more pervasive, more insistent and perhaps more subtly influential than “literature” …’ (1959)

Swain, M.O.B., LeMaistre, E.H., Fundamentals of Physical Education (1964). Ian Novak Publishing Co: Sydney.

‘The school staff itself, particularly beyond the primary school level, is seen as a team of specialist teachers striving for the common goal – the development of the whole child – but by different paths.’ (1964)

‘The physical education curriculum is not something remote from, or even distinct from, a school’s “academic” curriculum. It is a vital part of it.’ (1964)

‘Dance satisfies a deep need for self-expression through bodily movement, and it provides for those who prefer to develop skill in the use of their bodies as a means of expression rather than skill in competitive sport.’ (1964)

‘When it is required to teach an activity which is to be done in a certain way … it is best to show how it should be done. A good demonstration is far more effective than any amount of description.’ (1964)

‘The primary school child needs scope for vigorous, adventurous movement. Physical skills are most readily learned at this time … attitudes towards exercise, sport and competition are being formed.’ (1964)

‘Physical education is very closely concerned with the development of attitudes and in this regard much is done to promote team spirit and the ability to work and play with others.’ (1964)

‘To meet the varied ability and experience of first year pupils, class groups should be small enough to enable the physical education teacher to teach the whole group.’ (1964)

‘Adolescence can be a time of idealism and enthusiasm and children can be helped through physical education to develop desirable adult attitudes and values.’ (1964)

‘Every child whatever his ability has a right to the best teaching that can be provided. The aim of physical education is not to train champions but to educate them.’ (1964)

‘Because all children take physical education, and because it is generally a popular subject, the physical education teacher is likely to have a considerable influence in the school. (1964)

Winslow, Leon Loyal. Art in Secondary Education (1941). McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc: New York and London

‘Since the creative ability of children varies greatly at any particular grade or age level, this requires that the [educational] methods employed at any level shall be many and varied.’ (1941)

‘The principal may help to improve art teaching also by requiring that art education be carried on as an essential and integral part of the school program.’ (1941)

‘[Teachers] should strive to attain an integrated and balanced program of art education, one in which appreciation and creation, information and activity are properly related.’ (1941)

‘Art should help boys and girls to a fuller understanding of contemporary cultures through becoming familiar with their art.’ (1941)

‘Life should be enriched through knowledge of art in its relation to the community and of the power of art in promoting better communities and better community living.’ (1941) 

‘Art is a creative process, so also is play; both are free and active pursuits that belong to the amateur as well as the expert.’ (1941) 

‘When the paths of art education and physical education run side by side or actually come together, there is an additional opportunity for appreciation of the beauty that enriches both.’ (1941) 

‘Responsibility, too, can be developed in the art class, for there are many materials and tools to be used, and finished products to be cared for. In attempting to turn out a work of art he can realize that it is his own responsibility to produce the best of which he is capable.’ (1941) 

‘The study of art is of particular use to the student in school because it ties up so closely with all of the other subjects studied, because it helps to enrich these subjects and to make them more interesting.’ (1941) 

Godfrey, J.A., Clearly, R.C. (1953) School Design and Construction. The University Press: Glasgow.

‘A large part of the children’s time is spent outdoors … and consequently there should be no hard and fast barrier between the interior and exterior of a nursery.’ (1953)

‘The garden plays very nearly as large a part in the life of a nursery as do the playrooms, and it needs to be as informal and intimate as the building itself.’ (1953)

‘Natural features such as trees and bushes, hollows, and hummocks, all provide opportunities for imaginative play and should be preserved or created if not already in existence.’ (1953)

‘At least 60 sq. ft. per child of garden space in which the children can run and play freely must be provided.’ (1953)

‘The child, in fact, is the basis of design and his need for a friendly, stimulating building which provides ample space for his manifold activities, while still being reasonable in cost, must be met.’ (1953)

‘To encourage the children to regard one particular classroom as their own, it would be advisable to provide each room with an individual colour scheme.’ (1953)

‘It is the children’s needs which form the fundamental basis for the design of educational buildings, just as they form the basis for the educational system as a whole.’ (1953)

‘Essential cooperation should exist between the people who design the schools on the one hand, and the people who are to live in them and are responsible for their organisation on the other hand.’ (1953)

‘The school building in itself is a potent instrument of education … and the recognition of this fact has come to be the corner-stone to the contemporary approach [of] the fusion of educational and functional requirements to provide a stimulating environment.’ (1953)

‘The sense of hearing plays its part in producing an emotional state, and can be aided or impeded by a room which sounds lively and spacious or dull and oppressive.’ (1953)

Boyce, E. R. (1953). The First Year in School. James Nisbet and Co. LTD: London. 

‘Five-year-olds play absorbedly for long periods when pursuing a self-chosen interest. The ability to attend to tasks imposed by other people is late developing, but it comes as a direct result of the practice of concentration in play.’ (1953)

‘[Teachers and parents] should know each other, share their knowledge of the child and allow him to see teacher and parent together. There should be a common element in each of their worlds.’ (1953)

‘From the first day, teachers watch for signs which tell them what a child is like. As his personality unfolds, they begin to realize what he will need from his teacher, from the other children and from the school environment.’ (1953)

‘Children should be allowed to make their mistakes in school, and express their conflicts and uncertainties through the legitimate channels of play.’ (1953)

‘Music, like words, is woven in and out of the day and contributes to the general feeling of well-being and stimulates an eager response from most children.’ (1953)

‘We could provide each child with similar experiences in the same environment but no two would respond in the same way.’ (1953)

‘Outdoor spaces are real playgrounds where learning happens. The children do what they want with anything they find.’

‘Let us boldly bring our classrooms to life with the materials from which children can build their own experience and do away with terms that suggest that learning is a mechanical process.’ (1953)

‘In order to decide on the kind of materials which most five-year-olds need in school … let us think in terms of their spontaneous activities which are the direct outcome of inward needs and interests.’ (1953)

Do you have an old education textbook that you still refer to? What education texts are you currently reading? Facebook or Tweet us a photo or your favourite quote with the author and the year of publication.

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