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Room 3: Volume 9 Room 3: Volume 9

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Room 3: Volume 9

Once a fortnight the Teacher team ventures down to Room 3 – the basement archives at the Australian Council for Educational Research.

Home to a plethora of texts originating from way back when, we bring you choice titbits from some of our favourite historical titles via Facebook and Twitter.

If you happened to have missed some of our Room 3 gems, here's a recap of what's recently been posted online (you can also click on the links at the bottom of this article to explore previous volumes):

Cunningham, R. (et al.), Understanding Group Behaviour of Boys and Girls (1951) Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia University: New York.

‘Teachers are becoming increasingly aware of their responsibility to help every pupil acquire the immediate social skills of getting along with others.’ (1951)

‘Even creativity, often thought to be a purely individual matter, is frequently group-linked. Some experience is, of course, individual and isolated. But in any society … much experience is in terms of the interaction of people.’ (1951)

‘We are growing in our awareness that there is such a thing as group creativity – creative action by the group.’ (1951)

‘Group art, as in planning and executing murals, group creation of music, poetry, dramatics, rhythms, dance, and other creative activity not only are important expressions of the group process but may be important forms of art.’ (1951)

‘Behaviour is not the result of innate meanness or of inborn goodness, but is caused by what a person has experienced or is experiencing.’ (1951)

‘A group that was able to develop goals, plan attainment of goals, cooperate in achieving them, and evaluate progress was the group that learned, grew, and developed.’ (1951)

‘Teachers whom observers agreed were most effective used the widest range of patterns, according to the appropriateness of the pattern to the situation.’ (1951)

‘It is recognised that the professed aim of our society is to develop the skills and attitudes which contribute to democracy and to individual and group welfare. It is expected that the pattern of interaction in the classroom will contribute to attaining this objective.’ (1951)

Once a fortnight the Teacher team ventures down to Room 3 – the basement archives at the Australian Council for Educational Research.

Home to a plethora of texts originating from way back when, we bring you choice titbits from some of our favourite historical titles via Facebook and Twitter.

If you happened to have missed some of our Room 3 gems, here's a recap of what's recently been posted online (you can also click on the links at the bottom of this article to explore previous volumes):

Cunningham, R. (et al.), Understanding Group Behaviour of Boys and Girls (1951) Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia University: New York.

‘Teachers are becoming increasingly aware of their responsibility to help every pupil acquire the immediate social skills of getting along with others.’ (1951)

‘Even creativity, often thought to be a purely individual matter, is frequently group-linked. Some experience is, of course, individual and isolated. But in any society … much experience is in terms of the interaction of people.’ (1951)

‘We are growing in our awareness that there is such a thing as group creativity – creative action by the group.’ (1951)

‘Group art, as in planning and executing murals, group creation of music, poetry, dramatics, rhythms, dance, and other creative activity not only are important expressions of the group process but may be important forms of art.’ (1951)

‘Behaviour is not the result of innate meanness or of inborn goodness, but is caused by what a person has experienced or is experiencing.’ (1951)

‘A group that was able to develop goals, plan attainment of goals, cooperate in achieving them, and evaluate progress was the group that learned, grew, and developed.’ (1951)

‘Teachers whom observers agreed were most effective used the widest range of patterns, according to the appropriateness of the pattern to the situation.’ (1951)

‘It is recognised that the professed aim of our society is to develop the skills and attitudes which contribute to democracy and to individual and group welfare. It is expected that the pattern of interaction in the classroom will contribute to attaining this objective.’ (1951)

Do you have an old education textbook that you still refer to? What education texts are you currently reading? Facebook or Tweet us a photo or your favourite quote with the author and the year of publication.

Do you have an old education textbook that you still refer to? What education texts are you currently reading? Facebook or Tweet us a photo or your favourite quote with the author and the year of publication.

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